Friday, November 23, 2012

Fine Motor Development Girls vs. Boys

photo of: Fine Motor Development: Girls vs. Boys via RainbowsWithinReach

FINE MOTOR LEADS TO FINE ARTS -- Part 37
"A Picture's Worth a Thousand Words" 

It's Friday! For some it's 'shopping' Friday.
Welcome to my little corner of the blog-o-sphere if this is your first visit. 
For the last nine months I've been having a focus of fine motor on Fridays. 
----------------------------
Let me back up a tad for any newbies and introduce myself: 
  • I'm a 'music-lady' that's recorded over 100 original children's songs 
  • Before this 17 year chapter, I was an elementary Art teacher
  • I've turned 3 of my songs into traditional picture books as illustrator
  • I LUV to see how + what + when + where children create
  • I'm a GeeGee (grandma) to seven wonders, including a set of twins
  • Our amazing twins include a boy and a girl: age 4.5 years


photo of: Turkey Creations from Apples and Marshmallows, Differences between the sexes via RainbowsWithinReach

"A Picture's Worth a Thousand Words" 
Two pictures are worth 10,000 words!!
I can't wait to see what I write about these pictures. First of all let me tell you that they are each very near and dear to my heart. VERY dear. 

These apple beauties were made early this week at preschool by my twin grand-wonders. Their particular preschool is very 'child-centered' and allows the children to direct much of their time at the program. The young students are offered many centers and 'educational' opportunities, but allowed to move through the centers at their own direction and discretion. 

As the grandma to these two glories I can tell you some of my observations. Little girlie-girl has been known to bring home a dozen 'projects' (paper creations/paintings yada yada doo-dahs) after a morning away. Her sibling brother, Baby A, an all-boy-boy, and approximately two minutes older, will have NO projects to bring home after the same amount of time, with the same teachers, in the same classroom. You do the math. Zilch. Hmmmm.

This my friends is the subject of someone's doctoral thesis. Seriously. Two children of different sexes. Same EXACT age. Same genetic pool. Same EXACT environment. Different approaches to the world. You've heard of Venus and Mars, right? Best selling books. Right? This is where it all starts. [Actually I'm guessing that the differences begin well before preschool.]

Let's start with the Baby B version. Girl style. Observations? GO!


photo of: Turkey Centerpiece using Apple and Cereal Bits
Preschool Turkey: Created by 4.5 Year old Girl

Little Red has looked at the teacher's model and created her rendition with joy. 
Not having been privy to seeing the teacher-model, I'm just guessing that her end-product has a striking similarity to the example. She has worked very diligently to follow the model provided. Tooth pics radiating happily with concentric circles of cereal and glorious triangular corn embellishments. I can only imagine how long it took her to craft this gobbler.

VOILA! BEHOLD. Another vision. 


photo of: Preschool "Turkey" Sculpture (boy version) via RainbowsWithinReach

Now for an examination of the 'boy version.' First of all let me just say, "I'm THRILLED!" Obviously the thrill is on multiple levels. I'm thrilled that Mr. Eyelashes made-a-project himself!!!!! Awesome on so many levels. Now I'm guessing (since I wasn't there) that our little-guy also had the chance to see the teacher-model. What conclusions did he experience?

What assumptions can we reach from his finished outcome? 

Perhaps the child is a creative genius. He used all of the same pieces and parts. The outcome is totally his own. Is this because he had his own vision? Is this because he is challenged in three dimensional perception? Is this because he's a maverick, outside the box, doin' his own brilliant thang, sculptor-in-the-making? Is this because he ate all the cereal allotted for his structure? Is this because he is fascinated with machinery? Cars, trucks, planes, boats = curiosity.  Hmmmmm. 

Sharing the photo of his creation this morning with extended family over egg casserole, his Great Aunt suggested he was making his own "Turkey Transformer". I LUV her insight! His outcome does indeed have a clever 
inter-galactic, satelite-esque, moon-walkin' robotic sorta appearance. 

I'm guessing that Martha Stewart would prefer Little Red's rendition for one of her magazine shoots as the family centerpiece. On the other hand George Lucas might select the Mr. Eyelash version as inspiration for his next movie-shoot. You be the judge. Or better yet? Judge ye not!

So what do we learn from these two examples of fine motor development on this particular Friday? 
  1. We need to offer all sorts of materials, ingredients, pieces + parts, bits + bobs to every child -- for whatever skill level their creativity, insight and capability dictate.
  2. There will be different outcomes from different children. 
  3. It's critical to applaud the effort of every child.
  4. It's not a stretch to image that there are some innate differences between boys and girls. Honest.
  5. CELEBRATE unique, original, creative energy. 
  6. If you're working on your doctoral thesis using twins in fine motor capability, contact me for the use of these fine examples to be included in your study. You are welcome to use this material with the promise that you will report back here and give us your insight when you collate all of your findings.
Far be in from me to suggest that little boys and little girls look at apples, tooth pics and marshmallows differently. I'll let you reach your own conclusions based on this evidence, mixed with your own observations from real life.

What is your experience? What are your thoughts? Do you notice differences between the boys and girls in your classroom? How so? How do you interest those not typically intrigued with fine motor work into that critical realm? Inquiring minds want to know!!!
photo of: FRIDAY!!! FINE MOTOR FRIDAY!!!  Fine Motor Leads to Fine ARTS, Part
Marshmalows as Paint Brushes
P.S. Speaking of marshmallows...... they make AWESOME paint brushes of sort to explore paint application. Two weeks ago they were the subject of inspiration here and I think you'll really enjoy seeing those beauties from one of my recent Author/Illustrator school visits. 

 -- Debbie -- 

We're gearing up for the big sale early next week. 
My new little store at TeachersPayTeachers will be 20% off.
Making all of my products there 28% off.
Pre-K, Kindergarten, First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth - TeachersPayTeachers.com

photo of: Three Picture Books by Debbie Clement of Rainbows Within Reach

Come over and get THE, BEST prices ever on my books!

photo of: Teachers Pay Teachers Cyber Monday/Tuesday SALE

Linked this article to Sunday Showcase at Mom to 2 Posh Divas

16 comments:

  1. Oh Debbie, this post made me smile :) Hope your Thanksgiving was magical.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So glad to have incited your smile! Our Thanksgiving was filled with blessings.

      Debbie

      Delete
  2. Debbie, I see this all the time in my classroom - each child is so unique and their take on things is so different! I love open ended projects that allow each child to express themselves! Thanks for sharing this with us!

    Jennifer @ Herding Kats In Kindergarten

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. OPEN ENDED!!! OPEN ENDED!!!! Let's start chanting this together, shall we? Can I send my peeps to you?

      Debbie

      Delete
  3. Fantastic! Boys and girls are different, I suspected it all along.... :) Loved these creations!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too -- with the suspecting. Thanks for stopping by.

      Debbie

      Delete
  4. These are wonderful photos - and a very insightful post. Let's give children the materials and freedom to create and do art as they want. Love it and will pin this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Susan, I'm so appreciative of your support. We're cut from the same cloth -- that's for certain. Thanks for the pin.

      Debbie

      Delete
  5. Cute. I love how every child sees things so differently.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yup. Every child has their own insight. These examples are simply "CLASSIC" for that truth. Thanks for popping over.

      Debbie

      Delete
  6. So true, boys are developing big muscles for sports and girls don't develop large muscles first. :-) Yes, applaud each child and person! Carolyn

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Applause. Applause. Applause. Carolyn. What would I do without you? You're the best!

      Debbie

      Delete
  7. Thanks for sharing! How cute. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This was such an 'easy' share. I'm grateful for your taking the time to chime in!

      Debbie

      Delete

I LUV to hear from you! Please leave your thoughts so we can interact!!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...